Agile Practices in Project Management

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Culture Shift and Change in Process Can Mean Agile Success for IT Development Projects Member Content
- By Barrington Rowe MSc, BSc, PMP
By accepting that agile is not always suitable, organizations can create the framework that will allow them to apply the approach to the right projects. The author proposes criteria to use as a guide to determine which projects are most suitable for agile. He explains why cross-functional teams, along with automated and integrated tools, could be the catalysts that will allow more organizations to quickly change their processes and adopt agile.

Agile in Software Projects: Where Does it Fit? Where Doesn’t it? What about Hybrid Models? Member Content
- by Ambadapudi Sridhara Murthy, M.Tech, PMI-SP, PMP
Agile is being adopted by many organizations to support the business goals of quicker delivery and lesser costs. This article provides an insight into the scenarios where agile would be a best fit; explains certain situations in which agile might fail; and also highlights the advantages of other software development methodologies and the best projects these can be used for.

Simple Model for Agile Development Member Content
- by Tony Alletag, PMI-ACP, PMP
Many software development teams want or need to transition to agile but are not sure how to get started. The purpose of this paper is to simplify the roles, responsibilities, meetings, and iteration cycles so that an agile team can easily begin to implement their own agile process that works for their team, clients, customers, and users.

Scrum Values Member Content
- by Badri N. Srinivasan, PMP
Many project teams implement the Scrum framework without a clear understanding of the five Scrum values: focus, openness, commitment, courage, and respect. The author expounds on the five values of Scrum and highlights how a proper understanding of these values translates into an effective and successful implementation of Scrum in the project.

Agility in Fixed-Price Projects Member Content
- by Siju P. Varghese
A fixed-price project typically locks down the scope, cost, and time of the project and leads us to believe there is no room for agility. However, by examining two key phases involved while engaging in a fixed-price contract, the author explains how agility can provide more value to the client. He argues that success requires greater engagement on the part of the customer and the provider and illustrates with a sample scenario.

Using the Wall Gantt to Track Tasks in an Agile Environment Member Content
- by Lew Sauder, PMP
Tracking and controlling project tasks is one of the most challenging responsibilities of a project manager. The wall Gantt is a simple, low-tech, and easily adoptable approach which allows a project manager to track and report project status, while keeping team members informed and up to date on everyone’s task status.

Agile Software Development and Job Enrichment Member Content
- by John A. O’Shea, PMP, CSSLP
This essay explores Scrum concepts and describes ways in which the Scrum methodology supports the job enrichment of the employees and teams developing software. The topics covered in this article include: task identity, skill variety, vertical loading, feedback, transparency, and personal observations from a Scrum implementation.

Adopting Agility in Practice Member Content
- by Ruba Ashayer
The agile methodology is a popular approach for managing software development. This article outlines the main issues faced by one software company as they adopted a new approach for software development management: scrum. It presents the interaction between the scrum methodology and PMI’s concepts in a practical and real example.

Culture Shift and Change in Process Can Mean Agile Success for IT Development Projects Member Content
- By Barrington Rowe MSc, BSc, PMP
By accepting that agile is not always suitable, organizations can create the framework that will allow them to apply the approach to the right projects. The author proposes criteria to use as a guide to determine which projects are most suitable for agile. He explains why cross-functional teams, along with automated and integrated tools, could be the catalysts that will allow more organizations to quickly change their processes and adopt agile.

Software Development: Waterfall to Agile (Scrum) Member Content
- by Mark Meade, PMP
What does it take to migrate a software development team from the traditional waterfall methodology to an agile methodology? For the majority of my career, the waterfall methodology was the method of choice and was what I used to manage projects. As agile methodologies were introduced, they became controversial as well as intriguing to me. Could these new methodologies really address the concerns of the waterfall approach effectively?

Software Development with Agile Approach Member Content
- by Rohit Sinha, PMP
Agile is no longer a buzz word, and the immediate returns are what is making it popular. The basic philosophy of the agile approach is to accommodate changes. This article briefly talks about agile methodology and its characteristics and provides details about managing software projects with agile practices.