Born Again

Church Closings Spark Redevelopment Projects

As houses of worship close across the U.S. due to dwindling attendance, secular projects are popping up to transform them into condos, offices and even hotels. Church sales in the U.S. jumped by almost 100 percent between 2010 and 2015, according to real estate data tracker CoStar Group. During roughly the same time, Catholic parishes in the U.S. declined 4 percent from 2010 to 2016, according to Georgetown University-affiliated Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate. And the number of church redevelopment projects more than tripled.
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