Project Management Institute

It wasn't cleaned in a day

a project is removing centuries of grime to restore Rome, Italy's ancient Colosseum

“It needs a huge amount of attention to detail. It's all being done by hand.”

—Pia Petrangeli, architect, Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism, Rome, Italy to The Telegraph

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Millennia after hosting Roman emperors and gladiators, the Colosseum was in need of a wash. And though bureaucratic and funding issues initially delayed a project to give the almost 2,000-year-old amphitheater in Rome, Italy its first-ever scrubbing, they were sidestepped after a billionaire businessman donated €25 million in 2011.

Centuries of decay and more than 6 million annual visitors have made washing the iconic structure a painstaking process. The Colosseum has remained open during the project, so the 10-person team has to work on small sections at a time to avoid obstructing too many views. They are slowly making a clockwise journey around the amphitheater, using hundreds of jets of water to gently spray away centuries of grime.

“We don't want to do a face-lift, just a cleaning,” Rossella Rea, director of the Colosseum, told The Telegraph. “It is important to retain the marks of the past.” The project is slated to be completed in October.

PROJECT:

Colosseum restoration

LOCATION:

Rome, Italy

BUDGET:

€25 million

SLOW SCRUB:

The project team is armed with toothbrushes to clean narrow cracks in stone.

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PM NETWORK MAY 2016 WWW.PMI.ORG
MAY 2016 PM NETWORK

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