Creating a technical work force for tomorrow

In the United States, many citizens have long help that the belief that achieving professional and personal success begins with attending college and earning a four-year degree. But as recent surveys have shown, many US citizens lack the kind of aptitude required for college study. More important, these studies have also shown that the US labor market needs more individuals with professional technical training, as opposed to workers holding college degrees. This article--written by an executive vice president for chemical company Miles Inc.--discusses how the US can improve its investment in preparing younger generations of workers for technical careers. In doing so, it compares the US's efforts to train technical professionals against the programs supported by the governments in Germany, Australia, and Japan. It explains the social role that businesses must play in helping US workers prepare for professional careers as technicians, recommending particular programs and activities that they can participate in and contribute to. It identifies the business community--and not governments or academia--as the force that must generate change, noting how they can create opportunities for the younger generation to find and develop careers in the technical professions.
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