Project Management Institute

The Long Haul

Updating The Power Grid In Tibet

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PHOTO BY WANG HE/GETTY IMAGES

Talk about putting in the legwork. To update the power grid in Tibet's Hengduan Mountains, workers and mules are lugging transmission tower components across miles of rugged terrain, at an average altitude of 3,750 meters (12,303 feet). Given the conditions and climate, the CNY16.2 billion government-sponsored effort—the world's highest power transmission project—can be worked on only six months of the year. When the transmission towers are completed in 2018, they will help provide enough electricity to reliably supply power to half of Tibet's population.

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