Power players

When moving forward with major projects that can potentially reduce operating costs, organizations will often develop future budgets that include the future savings they will realize. This was the case with Newmont Nevada Energy Investment when it launched its effort to build a US$533 million coal-fired power plant, a project designed and implemented by the Fluor Corporation. But then an unexpected event--Hurricane Katrina--occurred. And the project's workforce packed up to join the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. This article profiles the realization of the Newmont plant project, focusing on how the project team addressed and resolved the numerous challenges involved in delivering--in April 2008, ahead of schedule and below cost--a project that is expected to save Newmont about US$70 million a year in operating costs. In doing so, it identifies the strategies that Fluor used to recruit workers and the methods it used to ensure that known project problems were honestly communicated--without consequence to the messenger. It describes the innovative technologies and design requirements--such as creating a facility capable of safety using extremely volatile low-sulfur coal and sustaining an 8.0 magnitude earthquake--that the project team realized while meeting project milestones and regulatory requirements. It then explains how Newmont kept track of the project's progress and held the Fluor team accountable for the final result.
registered user content locked

Log in or join PMI to gain access

or Account Registration

Advertisement

Advertisement

Related Content

Advertisement

Publishing or acceptance of an advertisement is neither a guarantee nor endorsement of the advertiser's product or service. View advertising policy.