Charged with Innovation

The ROI for Battery Technology Projects is Potentially Huge

Some technologies resist improvements. Take the lithium-ion batteries in laptops and mobile devices: They continue to bedevil project teams on the hunt for big breakthroughs that deliver longer battery life and faster charges. For example, after spending US$190 million, the Bill Gates-backed startup Aquion Energy filed for bankruptcy in March 2017, citing the "extremely complex, time-consuming and very capital-intensive" electrochemistry process of developing a new battery platform.
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