Living and working longer

In the United States, where healthier lifestyle habits and dropping fertility rates are the current norm, the workforce of the near future--and the schedules they will work--will differ significantly from those of generations past and workers today. Older workers will more likely work longer--for money or for mental and social stimulation--and younger workers most probably require more flexible schedules, especially those who care for elderly parents in addition to small children. This article discusses these issues and identifies two key challenges facing workers: that younger workers will need to develop the people skills that will enable them to communicate more effectively and that older workers will need to acquire the technological skills that will allow them to perform more efficiently.
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