Authentic Imitation

Appetite for Meat-Substitute Projects Grow

Fake meat is real. But it's up to project teams to ensure that alternatives to beef, chicken, pork or fish—whether sourced from plants or made in a lab—taste just like the real thing. The global meat substitutes industry is projected to reach US$5.2 billion by 2020—an annual compound growth rate of 8 percent since 2015, according to Allied Market Research. A slew of startups, including SuperMeat in Israel and Beyond Meat in the United States, have launched projects to develop products that replicate the taste and even juice of real meat.
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