Effectiveness

Christian A. Jensen, PMP, Microsoft, Business Owner, Project Management Profession, Redmond, Wash., USA

Christian A. Jensen, PMP, Microsoft, Business Owner, Project Management Profession, Redmond, Wash., USA

In the context of business, effectiveness combines capacity and capability to meet mission, goals and objectives. At Microsoft, we are continuously evaluating capacity and capability as a factor in competitive advantage, our ability to deliver on mission. We are effectively prepared in the breadth and depth of technology and the best utilization of our products and services.

Project management is both a shared and discrete competency. Shared across the organization, from product development, sales and marketing to services, project management provides structure and discipline at the most fundamental level, in effective time management and in the ability to articulate our products and services.

Effectiveness is a current state of readiness and the ability to act on it. The project manager who wants to improve effectiveness as a discrete competency should focus on the career path. While this is a smaller representation within the organization, it is the project manager that provides critical planning, team orchestration and control to ensure programs and projects meet performance objectives.

An effective leader has a winning disposition and is a big-picture visionary. For project managers to become effective as leaders, they must transcend the tactical charge and become strategically prudent. Project managers that are good leaders are naturally effective at program management and facilitating and aligning organizational strategy.

Project managers who want to improve the effectiveness of their teams must ensure a shared vision, that is, all stakeholders and team members must understand what they are working toward, how it aligns with mission and aligns with their personal vision. Otherwise conflict of interest arises and creates dissension within the team.

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PHOTO BY RICK DAHMS

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LEADERSHIP / 2005 / WWW.PMI.ORG
LEADERSHIP / 2005

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