The importance of building a foundation for user involvement in information system projects

User involvement in the process of developing information systems has long been known to be a critical component of eventual success. This study examines the importance of building an acceptable foundation for the interactions between the stakeholders in the project's outcome. A model is developed and empirically tested via a survey that explains the relationship between the foundation, the amount of user related risk, and the project performance. The partnering activities used to build the foundation prove to be significant in the eventual process and should be considered as part of each development project.
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