Johannesburg, South Africa

Johannesburg has long been a major business hub in a nation known for its bustling mining industry. But market competition and the global economic downturn have forced both the nation and this city of 3.2 million residents to refocus their business interests towards new industries. This article discusses the state of Johannesburg business community and the major projects underway that could help the city and its nation remain competitive for years to come. In doing so, it explains the city's roadmap--titled Joburg 2030--for transforming its physical environment and workforce into a global business center, an effort gaining momentum via the city's preparation to participate in South Africa's hosting of the 2010 World Cup. It overviews South Africa's plans to invest in large infrastructure projects over the next three years to counterthe economic downturn; it describes South Africa's project management culture, noting how and why local companies are integrating project management into their core organizational and operational processes. Accompanying this article are four sidebars: The first describes the city's effort to deliver affordable broadband access; the second defines the four biggest problems that Joburg 2030 is expected to help resolve; the third outlines the city's massive initiative to provide convenient public transportation; the fourth identifies the city's efforts to build new--or upgrade existing--stadiums for the 2010 World Cup.
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