Project Management Institute

Tengger Desert Solar Park

For Building the Great Wall of Solar (Most Influential Projects: #48)

Spanning some 43 square kilometers (16.6 square miles) in the open desert—and supplying power to more than 600,000 homes—Tengger Desert Solar Park was constructed at a never-before-seen scale, earning the impressive title of world's largest photovoltaic power facility both in size and production when it was completed in 2015. A joint effort of China National Grid and Zhongwei Power Supply Co., Tengger represents a renewable energy revolution underway in China: The country has pledged to have clean energy supply 35 percent of its total energy needs by 2030.
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